Exploring cultures and communities – the slow way

It is difficult to go to Reykjavík without getting a big dose of Icelandic history. Icelanders will proudly tell you the tale of Ingólfur Arnarson who gets a lot of credit all over Iceland for putting the country on the map in the late ninth century.

article summary —

It is difficult to go to Reykjavík without getting a big dose of Icelandic history. The inhabitants of the world's most northerly capital city all seem to have a good working knowledge of the Landnámabók, the mediaeval text that painstakingly documents the antics of the country's first four hundred settlers and their families. Genealogy is everywhere here. And history is big too! Icelanders will proudly tell you the tale of Ingólfur Arnarson who gets a lot of credit all over Iceland for putting the country on the map in the late ninth century.


This is just an excerpt. The full text of this article is not yet available to members with online access to hidden europe. Of course you can also read the full article in the print edition of hidden europe 4.

About the authors

hidden europe

and Susanne Kries manage hidden europe, a Berlin-based editorial bureau that supplies text and images to media across Europe. Together they edit hidden europe magazine. Nicky and Susanne are dedicated slow travellers. They delight in discovering the exotic in the everyday.

This article was published in hidden europe 4.